A woman who is the second person in the world to be “naturally” cured of HIV is grateful for the virus

Another patient in the world who has “naturally” recovered from HIV without the help of drugs or other treatments talks about how grateful he is to be free of the virus.

The 30-year-old woman, who researchers call an “Esperanza patient,” according to the city where she lives in Argentina, has been studied by a group in Buenos Aires and the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT and Harvard.

The researchers analyzed genetic material from more than a billion cells in the patient’s body and found no evidence of HIV.

They believe the woman is the “elite controller” of the virus, a rare patient whose body is able to suppress the virus and show no signs of infection.

“I enjoy health,” he told NBC News in Spanish by email anonymously.

‘I have a healthy family. I don’t need medicine, and I live like nothing happened. This is already a privilege.

Studies suggest that about 0.5 percent of people living with HIV have a uniquely strong immune response to the virus, with about 38 million currently with the virus worldwide.

If researchers are able to identify the secret behind HIV resistance in these patients, they may be able to take advantage of it in new treatments for the virus that are less onerous than patients ’current options.

Researchers have identified another patient who appears to have completely recovered from HIV through his or her own immune system, without treatment (file image)

Researchers have identified another patient who appears to have completely recovered from HIV through his or her own immune system, without treatment (file image)

According to the CDC, HIV is most prevalent in the United States in several southern states, parts of the Northeast, Nevada, and California.

According to the CDC, HIV is most prevalent in the United States in several southern states, parts of the Northeast, Nevada, and California.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has been the worst global public health crisis in two years, HIV / AIDS continues to affect millions of people around the world.

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system and, if left untreated, can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 1.2 million people in the United States will be living with HIV by the end of 2019.

That year, about 37,000 Americans were recently diagnosed with HIV. The virus disproportionately affects blacks and Hispanics and the LGBTQ + community.

Worldwide, an estimated 38 million people live with HIV, more than two-thirds of whom live in Africa.

HIV is a particularly challenging disease to treat because this virus works.

As a retrovirus, it transports single-stranded genetic material, called RNA, to human cells, then fuses with these cells and turns them into factories that produce more copies of HIV.

Currently, the best treatment option for HIV patients is a combination of drugs called antiretroviral therapy (or ART), which prevents the virus from making copies of itself in the body.

While this treatment can help HIV patients live long and healthy lives, they are tied to daily medical care – which can be challenging and expensive to maintain.

As a result, researchers are studying patients whose immune systems appear to be naturally resistant to HIV to find alternatives to new therapies.

Xu Yu, an immunologist at the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, leads a team that identified both patients who recovered.

Xu Yu, an immunologist at the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, leads a team that identified both patients who recovered.

One research team focusing on this is led by Xu Yu, an immunologist at the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT and Harvard.

Yun’s team has now identified two patients who appear to have completely recovered from the virus and lack HIV sequences in their bodies.

Researchers call this a “sterilizing drug” – both patients were “sterilized” from HIV without the help of drugs or bone marrow transplants.

The first patient to recover was reported in an article published in Nature in 2020.

Yun’s team sequenced more than a billion cells from this patient, called a “San Francisco patient,” and found no HIV.

Another healed patient was reported in an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine on Monday.

Like the “San Francisco patient,” Yun’s team sequenced 1.19 billion blood cells and 500 million tissue cells from this patient – and found no evidence of HIV.

This second patient, called “Esperanza Patient,” lives in Esperanza, Argentina, and was diagnosed with HIV in 2013.

Yun’s team has been working with researchers in Buenos Aires to sequence this patient’s genomic material since 2017, according to STAT News.

“These findings, especially when another case is identified, indicate that for people who are unable to do this themselves, there may be a workable pathway to sterilizing treatment,” Yu said in a statement.

According to Yun, two patients may have a unique capacity in their killer T cells, a group of cells in the immune system that recognizes and destroys cancer cells and other damaged cells.

If the killer T cells neutralize enough of the HIV-infected cells, they can prevent the virus from multiplying further – preventing patients from getting the disease.

Scientists call HIV patients with this ability “elite controllers.” Many of these patients have no symptoms of the virus and have very low levels of HIV in their bodies.

Studies estimate that about 0.5 percent of people living with HIV around the world are elite supervisors.

Gay and bisexual men and blacks and Hispanics are disproportionately vulnerable to HIV infection in the United States

Gay and bisexual men and blacks and Hispanics are disproportionately vulnerable to HIV infection in the United States

“We are now exploring the possibility of inducing such immunity in ART patients through vaccinations with the goal of training their immune systems to be able to control the virus without ART,” Yu said.

Two patients have previously recovered from HIV through treatment. One man, a “Berlin patient,” recovered from chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in 2008.

Another man, a “London patient,” recovered in 2019 – as did a bone marrow transplant.

Examining the “Esperanza patient,” the “San Francisco patient,” and other elite controllers will lead researchers to better understand how HIV lurks in the body for long periods of time – and what makes some people’s immune systems neutralize the virus.

In the case of an Esperanza patient, researchers who spoke to STAT News are particularly interested in learning more about what happened to his immune system when he was initially infected.

Researchers hope to develop a vaccine or treatment that can cure HIV instead of patients resorting to daily medication for the rest of their lives.

“The mere thought that my condition could help cure this virus makes me feel very responsible and committed to doing this,” Esperanza Patient wrote in an email to STAT News.

“Esperanza” is an appropriate title, the patient’s doctor said, because it is literally translated as “hope.”

The patient has given birth to one child who is HIV-negative and is now expecting another child.

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