Scientists find ‘longest-ever’ dinosaur, five London buses long after repairing fossil fuel

Picture of a Supersaur vs. a Carnivore Allosaurus (Sean Fox / Gustavo Monroy / Fossil Crates)

Picture of a Supersaur vs. a Carnivore Allosaurus (Sean Fox / Gustavo Monroy / Fossil Crates)

The longest dinosaur to ever travel on the planet may have measured more than 40 meters of muzzle at its tail – about five London buses in length – according to a new study of fossils previously mixed with other individuals.

The appropriately named Supersaurus is believed to have lived about 150 million years ago during the Jurassic period. The new findings, which have not yet been peer-reviewed, were presented online this month at the annual conference of the Vertebrate Paleontology Society.

If the results of this study are validated, it would make the Supersaurus longer than any other known dinosaur, including another challenger DiplodocusAccording to a 2006 study by researchers at the University of Western Australia, it could have reached a length of about 33 meters.

Although the Supersaurus has always been known to be one of the largest dinosaurs, a new study showed it to be “the longest dinosaur based on a decent skeleton,” said Brian Curtice, a paleontologist at the Arizona Museum of Natural History who led the study. science news site Live Science.

Scientists evaluated bone fragments from the Dry Mesa Dinosaur Quarry in southwestern Colorado, where the earliest specimen of a 2.4-meter-long scapulocoracoid was found in 1972 – the two fused bones that form the shoulder girdle of adult dinosaurs.

Jim Jensen, who made this discovery in 1972, also found more bones in the same pit that he believed belonged to two other giant dinosaurs, later named Ultrasaurus and Dystylosaurus.

But over the years, paleontologists debated whether Ultrasaurus and Dystylosaurus were real discoveries, and investigated the possibility that their bones were misidentified and actually belonged to one large supersaurus.

For example, one of the other scapulocoracoid bones exposed at the site was about 25 cm longer than the other, leading many researchers to believe it belonged to a different genus of dinosaurs.

But the current study showed that the bone was indeed distorted, and when the differences in length caused by the cracks in the second scapulocoracoid sample were taken into account, the fossil corresponded to the Supersaurus fossil.

Based on this evidence, as well as the finding that no other oversized dinosaur bones were found nearby, the researchers believe that “a 3-meter-long right scapula belongs to the same individual as a 3-meter-long scapula.”

“… indestructible, even Ischia, pubes, and scapulocoracoids belong to the same individual in terms of morphology, size, and proximity,” Dr. Curtice stated in an abstract presented at the conference.

The study showed that the Supersaurus could also have a 17-meter-long tail because the shoulder bone fossil was compared to the fossils of other closely related large dinosaurs and other missing parts were digitally reconstructed relative to the bones found.

“New elements indicate that the Supersaurus may have been more than 39 feet long,” Dr. Curtice said, adding that the neck of the giant beast may have exceeded 16 feet.

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