US suffers from MONKEYPOX: Maryland patient test positive for rare virus after trip to Nigeria

US suffers from MONKEYPOX: Maryland patient’s rare virus test positive after Nigeria trip, health authorities reveal

  • A resident of Maryland returning to the United States from Nigeria has been confirmed to be infected with smallpox.
  • An unnamed resident is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms and has not been hospitalized
  • All air passengers who have been in contact with a passenger on a flight and after returning to the United States are currently being tracked by health authorities
  • Monkeypox originated in monkeys kept for research in Central and West Africa and kills 1% of those infected.
  • The virus rarely infects humans and had disappeared for decades in the United States until it returned in 2003










A Maryland resident has shown a positive rare monkey pox virus after a recent trip to Nigeria.

According to the Maryland Department of Health (MDH), the patient has not been taken to hospital and is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms.

There is no information on the name, age, gender, place of residence and place of travel of a Nigerian resident in Nigeria.

Currently, health authorities say the general public does not need to take special precautions.

A resident of Maryland traveling back to the United States from Nigeria has been confirmed to have a monkeypox infection.  Pictured: Skin lesions that are a common symptom of monkey pox

A resident of Maryland traveling back to the United States from Nigeria has been confirmed to have a monkeypox infection. Pictured: Skin lesions that are a common symptom of monkey pox

An unnamed resident is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms and has not been hospitalized.  The virus can cause patches of skin that turn into blisters and can take weeks to clear (above)

An unnamed resident is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms and has not been hospitalized. The virus can cause patches of skin that turn into blisters and can take weeks to remove (above)

“Public health authorities have identified individuals who may have been in contact with the diagnosed person and will continue to monitor them,” Dr. Jinlene Chan, MDH’s Deputy Secretary for Public Health, said in a statement.

“Our response, in close collaboration with the authorities of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, demonstrates the importance of maintaining a strong public health infrastructure.”

The CDC released a media bulletin that its investigators confirmed on Tuesday that the passenger had monkeypox.

In addition, the strain that the patient became ill corresponds to the strain that has reappeared in Nigeria since 2017.

The CDC is currently working with the airline and health authorities to contact passengers who were on the same flight with the patient and may have been in contact with him.

“Passengers flying to the United States had to wear masks on board the plane as well as at the U.S. airports due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” the CDC said in a statement.

“Therefore, it is believed that the risk of spreading the monkeypox virus through respiratory droplets to other people on planes is low.

“In collaboration with airlines and the states and local health partners, the CDC is assessing the potential risks to those who may have been in close contact with a passenger on an aircraft and after entering the United States.”

Monkeypox was discovered in 1958 when a smallpox-like disease broke out in macaque monkeys eating crabs held for research.

The first case of human origin was discovered in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1970, after it has spread to many countries in Central and West Africa.

The monkey pox originated from crab-eating macaques (pictured) held for research in Central and West Africa and killing 1% of those infected

The monkey pox originated from crab-eating macaques (pictured) held for research in Central and West Africa and killing 1% of those infected

It is believed that the virus infects animals from humans when a primate bites or scratches a person.

It can also be spread from person to person through airborne droplets – in the same way that people apply COVID-19 to each other.

People with more severe cases of the virus often develop skin lesions, including rash and fever, and kill about one percent of those infected.

The disease had largely disappeared until the outbreak in the United States in 2003 saw the virus return to the people.

There are no specific treatments or vaccines available for monkey pox, although the smallpox vaccine is believed to help make it trouble-free for many years to come.

Other cases of monkey pox have been reported recently, including a Texas man in July and Wales in June, when at least two people became infected in the north of the country.

MONKEY IS A RARE DISEASE WHICH CAUSES SKIN AND FEVER

Monkey pox is a rare viral disease that causes a blistering rash and feverish, flu-like symptoms.

The causative agent of the disease occurs mainly in the tropics of West and Central Africa.

Monkey pox was first discovered in 1958, and the first human case was reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1970. Human cases were first recorded in the United States in 2003 and in the United Kingdom in September 2018.

It is found in wildlife, but humans can catch it in direct contact with animals, such as by touching monkeys, squirrels, rats, or other mammals, or by eating poorly cooked meat.

The virus can enter the body through broken skin or eyes, nose or mouth.

It can travel between people through airborne droplets and by touching the skin of an infected person or touching objects contaminated with them.

Symptoms usually appear within five to 21 days of infection. These include fever, headache, muscle aches, swelling of the lymph nodes, chills and tiredness.

The most obvious symptom is a rash that usually appears on the face before it spreads to other parts of the body. This then forms skin lesions that bite and fall off.

Monkey pox is usually mild, and most patients recover within a few weeks without treatment. However, the disease can often prove fatal.

According to the World Health Organization, no specific treatments or vaccines are available for monkey pox infection.

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